How I Know I’m Settled In

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A few weeks ago, I shared my experience with culture shock. Since then I’ve gotten much more comfortable here, and I want to share some happier thoughts!

It took just over a week for me to memorize the digital code for my apartment in Paris, but it made a huge difference when I finally did. Not having to pull out that sheet of paper to punch in the code made me feel like it was actually becoming my home. Another thing that makes me feel more local is cooking for myself. It’s made me familiar with markets, grocery stores, and my neighborhood, plus it’s a lot easier on my budget than eating at restaurants all the time.

I’ve also been spending more time talking with my host family, getting braver with longer statements and ideas. They tell me I’m doing really well, and the encouragement of native speakers is pretty high praise when you’re working on a foreign language. Plus it’s a sign that the improvement I’m noticing in myself is not just an illusion!

A city transportation experience also boosted my confidence. Recently I was hanging out with some friends, and was on the other side of Paris later than I meant to be, but I managed to get on the very last metro on my line for the night. What made it a victory, for me, was the fact that I wasn’t stressed out by the experience. If you know me, you know I generally like to have a plan and stay on schedule, especially when traveling. Proof: I made a spreadsheet when my friends and I went to Disney in high school (I’m not proud…well, maybe a little). My lack of anxiety made me realize that at this point, I’m beyond traveling; I’m living here, albeit temporarily. I’ve taken a taxi before and I know that if I needed to do it I absolutely could. I’m still glad I caught that train, though. Taxis are expensive.

Circles and triangles and one-way streets... No way I'd want to drive here!

Circles and triangles and one-way streets… No way I’d want to drive here!

In fact, the metro of Paris was one of the things that worried me the most before my arrival. There was no order, no pattern. But I’ve gotten a lot more comfortable with it since I’m staying in a very residential neighborhood. I don’t even have to map out my journeys ahead of time anymore; as long as I know what line my destination is on, I can get there without preparing.

The metro is also full of strangely amusing advertisements. Like Claude, here, who found the djembe of his dreams at a moderate price. Nice one, Claude.

The metro is also full of strangely amusing advertisements. Like Claude, here, who found the djembe of his dreams at a moderate price. Nice one, Claude.

Another achievement was speaking in class. For my first week, I think the only thing I said in class was “Yes, I’m cold,” because the air conditioning in that building is always set for freezing. But more recently we were discussing media and the quality of today’s journalism. Incase you missed it, I’m a journalism major. So I had some thoughts to share and I figured if I was ever meant to speak in class, that was the day. I wound up talking for several minutes about my ideas and experiences. My professor understood me in spite of a few errors, and it improved my confidence immensely.

I’m now at a point where I can say that despite occasional discomforts I’m really happy in Paris. I’m meeting incredible people and doing things that I find fun and interesting. That, for me, is definitely a success.

I’m finished with 3 of my 6 weeks of class now, and I’ve already started to wish I was staying for a semester instead of a summer. On the one hand, that makes me feel great about the prospect of studying for a semester in the future, but on the other I’m already dreading the day I have to leave this incredible city. I don’t think there’s a single other place in the world where I could see rodents in the metro station and be totally charmed by it. If only I could be a tiny mouse, and live in one of the world’s most beautiful cities without paying rent…

À bientôt!

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