Tag Archives: Art

History, Art, and a Lovely Día del Patrimonio

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History, Art, and a Lovely Día del Patrimonio

Recently, all of Chile celebrated the Día de Patrimonio (or, in English, “National Heritage Day”). To the best of my knowledge, we don’t really have an equivalent to this holiday in this U.S., and, if we do, it’s definitely not as widely-recognized or celebrated as it is in Chile and throughout other parts of South America. Here it’s a pretty big deal, and pretty much everyone celebrates it. In Chile, it’s a day where the museums, government buildings, universities, etc. are all open to the public. And it gets even better – on this day, almost all of them are free to enter! It’s really just a day about celebrating the history and culture of the country and coming together as a nation.

I took advantage of the free museums and went to a couple of art museums with my friend. We first went to this unconventional art museum right by my house. I had passed by it many times, but I had always assumed that it was some public government building or something. Apparently, it’s a free art museum full of all these crazy art exhibits. One of the exhibits had a table full of little pieces of paper with scissors chained to the table. It was an interactive exhibit, so each visitor could cut out a shape or something from their piece of paper and then put it in one of the gauze pockets that were hanging down from the ceiling. There’s only one word to describe it: ethereal. My contribution to the exhibit was a little dachshund that I carefully cut out and placed in one of the gauzy billows. I even made sure his little head was sticking out so that he could also observe the exhibit.

The second art museum we went to is a more traditional one called Palacio Barburizza. It was actually one of the first art museums in Latin America, with the National Museum of Fine Arts in Santiago being the very first one. As I learned from my tour of the museum, the building itself, which is actually a former mansion, was designed by two Italian architects at the beginning of the 20th century. It was originally built to be a home for one of the many well-to-do families in Valparaíso, but was transformed into an art museum in the 1970s. Many of the paintings there are paintings of Valparaíso and the surrounding area, but the majority are from the early 1900s. It was so cool to see the places that I’ve walked through many times captured in a painting, but, better yet, in a painting showing how these spots looked a hundred years ago. It’s like time-traveling in a sense because you can imagine yourself in that very same spot but in a time that now seems like a far-away, forgotten world. Obviously, in a hundred years, a lot has changed in Valparaíso. It’s now a lot bigger and sprawls on and on with seemingly never-ending hills. Before, it was a city that was all centered around the port and the ocean, so the urban hills were not nearly as extensive.

Overall, I had a lovely Día del Patrimonio and I wouldn’t trade it for anything. I learned a little bit more about Chilean culture from the various parades and stands that day, and I definitely learned a lot more about Chilean art. My only complaint is that now I want a Día del Patrimonio in the U.S., too, so that I can take advantage of all of Philadelphia’s museums!

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London: Lessons in Museum-Going

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London: Lessons in Museum-Going
As I’ve touched on in previous entries, London is a massively sized city. It rivals New York in this way, along with also being one of the main banking headquarters of the world. Central London is littered with tall suits and briefcases rushing to another day in the corporate life. They walk with purpose and urgency; two traits that aren’t exactly typical of outsiders–like me.
Spending a few days in London has given me the opportunity to take in all the sights and popular destinations that the city offers. Well, it was a start at least. It was impossible for me to see everything I want see in London in only three days, and the past three days have been jam-packed.
Some of the biggest attractions of London for me are the countless museums and galleries. The British Museum for example, with its FREE admission, houses the most extensive, and impressive, collection of artifacts from across the world I have ever seen. I spent three hours spent in there and I’m certain that I didn’t even get through half of museum. The British Library was another one of my priority stops–free, as any good library is, and overflowing with countless, priceless artifacts and original sources. Beyond just literature, it hosts an impressive collection of sound and musical artifacts, including early handwritten drafts of some of the most popular music of all time. I spent significantly little time in my hostel room–at the end of a trip I’ve found that a truly successful trip boils down to that: just how much time was spent exploring, and how little time was spent in bed!
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A clock– yes, a clock— on display at the British Museum. In a museum that houses millions of artifacts and pieces, my professor’s advice was essential to making the most of my experience there. I found that I gravitated towards the museum’s jaw-dropping collection of clockwork!

With such an abundance of priceless history at my fingertips, I certainly found it easy to experience information overload and become overwhelmed. It reminded me of the valuable advice a cherished professor of mine gave during an Art History lecture: when walking through a museum, gravitate towards whatever catches your eye first and focus on that, as opposed to trying to spend an equal amount of time with every single piece in one room. By following this advice, I found myself fixating on the slightest details and developing infatuations with select pieces, making for a much more memorable and intimate experience that went beyond just seeing certain pieces for the sake of being able to say I had seen them.

The last few weeks of the semester…

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In Ttalian Theater class during one of the last classes, discussing  Filumena Marturano

In Italian Theater class during one of the last classes discussing Filumena Marturano.

One of the last on-site classes for sketchbook in Rme was right around the corner from school.

One of the last on-site classes for Sketchbook in Rome was right around the corner from school.

Students in the sketchbook class really improved throughout the semester

Students in the Sketchbook class really improved throughout the semester.

Art show at local bar Circolo degli Artisti in Rome, Temple Rome had a room of art students.

Art show at a local bar, Circolo degli Artisti, in Rome.  Temple Rome had a room full of art students.

Temple Rome art student who participated in the are show.

Temple Rome art student who participated in the art show.

Byron Wolfe, Professor at Temple Tyler School of Art came to Temple Rome for a vist.

Byron Wolfe, Professor at Temple Tyler School of Art, came to Temple Rome for a visit.

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What was left of the end of the semester student show in the Temple Rome gallery.

What was left of the end-of-the semester student show in the Temple Rome gallery.

Students in the Library studying for their finals

Students in the library studying for their finals.

Finals critiques for the sculpture class.

Finals critiques for the Sculpture class.

My roommate and I studying for finals at a cafe.

My roommate and I studying for finals at a cafe.

“Raking Grads”

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The 3 grads at Temple Rome have been preparing for this show all year. The opening night of "Raking Light".

The 3 grads at Temple Rome have been preparing for this show all year. The opening night of “Raking Light”.

Studio of Grad Grimaldi Baez

Studio of graduate student Grimaldi Baez.

Studio of grad Lindsay Deifik

Studio of graduate student of Lindsay Deifik.

Studio of grad Haigen Pearson

Studio of graduate student Haigen Pearson.

Lindsay and Dean Link at the opening

Lindsay and Dean Link at the opening.

Only the artist can touch their own work...(The boot was out of place)

Only the artist can touch their own work… (the boot was out of place).

Viewing some of Haigen's photographs

Viewing some of Haigen’s photographs.

Grimaldi's wall piece up close

Grimaldi’s wall piece up close.

Discussing the photograph

Discussing the photograph.

The work from all three artist flowed so well together.

The work from all three artists flowed so well together.

Teeny Tiny Show

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Opening Night of Temple's Tiny Biennale Show.

Opening Night of Temple’s Tiny Biennale Show. 

The curator and Temple Arts professor Susan Moore.

The curator and Temple Arts Professor Susan Moore.

Everyone needs to get up close and personal to check out the artworks

Everyone needs to get up close and personal to check out the artworks.

Temple Rome Professor Anita Guerra standing next to her tiny painting

Temple Rome Professor Anita Guerra standing next to her tiny painting.

Some student made tiny sculptures.

Tiny sculptures made by a student.

Tiny art by Temple painting major Macauley

Tiny art by Temple painting major Macauley.

Grad Student Haigen looking realy close at his art.

Graduate Student Haigen looking really close at his art.

Photo student Emma standing next to her tiny photo

Photography major Emma standing next to her tiny photo.

Tiny works by Mina, Eli, and Nellie (respectively)

Tiny works by Mina, Eli, and Nellie (respectively).

The show continues upstairs to the open studios.

The show continues upstairs to the open studios.

Around Temple Rome

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Student Teacher Conference during Sketchbook class at the Museum of Modern Art

Student-teacher conference during Sketchbook class at the Museum of Modern Art.

Student back to work in the computer lab after Spring break.

Students back to work in the computer lab after Spring Break.

Student working in the sculpting room.

Student working in the sculpting room.

Students' sculptures

Students’ sculptures.

After developing the film, you must clean the negative.

After developing the film, you must clean the negative.

This student puts her negatives up to the light to get a better look at them.

This student puts her negatives up to the light to get a better look at them.

The changing of the painting in the lobby. The new painting is done by our very faculty member at Temple Rome, Susan Moore.

The changing of the painting in the lobby. The new painting is done by our very own Faculty member at Temple Rome, Susan Moore.

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A work in progress by a grad student, Grimaldi Baez.

A work in progress by grad student, Grimaldi Baez.

The new exhibition in Temple Rome's art Gallery, "Tra di Noi' with faculty member's art work.

The new exhibition in Temple Rome’s art Gallery, “Tra di Noi’ with faculty member’s art work.

Art History Field Trip: The Setagaya Art Museum

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Being an Art History major, I’m really excited to find out that TUJ’s classes incorporate many field trips into the curriculum. This week my professor brought us to the Setagaya Art Museum to view an exhibit on the avant-garde Japanese art group Jikken Kobo. Since no photos were allowed in the museum, here are a collection of pictures from our pleasant walk to the museum.

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Another plus to the field trip was the opportunity to view a new Tokyo neighborhood. Setagaya was lovely on this cloudy day.

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The walk to the museum from the train station offered countless views of the area, including this walkway above the highway. These can be seen all over Tokyo. They’re a great use of design to impact the flow of pedestrians.

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These passages also offer great views of the sprawling city streets from above.

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The layout of Tokyo is always unexpected, offering surprises at every corner.

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Even with the massive urban development, there is an attention to nature, especially in the numerous parks around the city. The Setagaya Museum is located in Kinuta Family Park, which was filled with families enjoying the area.

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After a 20 minute walk through Setagaya, we approached the museum. The building was surrounded with beautiful sculptures.

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While this is hardly representative of the exhibit itself, the photo in the sign offers a hint at the collection of works by Jikken Kobo, which included photos, sculptures, paintings, drawings, film, music, and significant historical documents of the group’s exhibitions during the mid-20th century.

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Adding to our enjoyment, our professor decided to bring along his infant to see the art as well. Adorable!

Chinese New Year in Yokohama Chinatown

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To bring in the Year of the Horse, we headed down to Asia’s largest Chinatown (outside of China, of course): Yokohama, Japan.

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Yokohama is riddled with dark side streets lined with great restaurants, constantly surprising us at every turn.

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While we missed the majority of the traditional dragon dances, we caught a glimpse at the end. The dance is performed outside of stores and restaurants in hopes of bringing luck for the community.

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Chinatown was hypnotizing with endless color and decoration everywhere we looked. It was beautiful and bright, especially after sundown.

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After strolling for a while and smelling the amazing aromas wafting out of the countless restaurants, we began to get hungry.

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There was an overwhelming amount of choices, most notably was this display of shark-fin soup!

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We settled for dumplings instead of mysterious sharkmeat. There was a massive steamer outside of this restaurant that we just couldn’t pass up.

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After stuffing ourselves with dumplings, we had to satisfy the sweet tooth. Street food is plentiful, especially for jin deui:  a fried Chinese pastry made of rice flour, usually filled with sweet bean paste.

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The pastry is covered in sesame seeds for a pleasant crunchiness. It’s delicious when it’s fresh and warm!

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Out of all of our experiences during the Chinese New Year, just the slow exploration of the area was the most exciting. Fortune telling was a popular venue in the neighborhood.

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And just when we thought we had gotten used to Yokohama, we suddenly were audience to an impressive car show!  A happy new year indeed.

Las Estatuas de Oviedo

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Oviedo is home to many great works of art, such as sculptures and statues that can be found in every corner of the city.

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This statue, sculpted by Eduardo Úrculo, is commonly known as ‘The Traveler’ but its official title is ‘El Regreso [Return] de Williams B. Arrensberg.’ The story behind the statue is a bit of a mystery because apparently Úlrculo never revealed who exactly Mr. Arrensberg was.

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A statue of King Alfonso II stands outside the Cathedral of San Salvador. Alfonso II was the King of Asturias from 791-842.

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This sculpture depicts the Asturian custom of el escanciado de la sidra (pouring of the cider). Asturian cider is bottled naturally, so waiters will hold the bottle high above the glass and slowly pour the cider to allow it to aerate.

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Dr. Manuel Avello Fernández was a journalist and professor who became the official chronicler of Oviedo. His bust was sculpted by Vicente Menéndez Santarúa.

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Officially titled ‘La Maternidad’ (Maternity), this sculpture by Fernando Botero is commonly referred to as ‘La Gorda.’ It’s a great meeting point because it’s easily recognizable, and it’s located at La Plaza de la Escandalera, which is near the center of Oviedo.

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This life-sized statue of Woody Allen was sculpted by Vicente Menéndez Santarúa after Allen won the Prince of Asturias award in 2002. Allen spent time in Oviedo during the filming of ‘Vicky Cristina Barcelona.’

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‘La Bailarina’, by Santiago de Santiago, is a bit more abstract than most of the other sculptures in Oviedo, but no less appealing.

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Several sculptures, such as this one, adorn the fields and walkways of the San Francisco Park in Oviedo.

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The ‘Culis Monumentalibus,’ commonly referred to as ‘El Culo’ is another sculpture by Eduardo Úrculo.

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‘La Lechera’ by Manuel Garcia Linares depicts a milk maid in traditional garb.